The Female Camouflagers of World War I.

Becht

Marguerite Carmel Becht (later Wilson), artist and member of the Camouflage Reserve Corps. Image from her 1918 passport application.

The National Archives’ Unwritten Record blog highlights World War I’s Camouflage Reserve Corps of the National League for Women’s Service, including cool photos of the women in training and painting the U.S.S. Recruit (a recruitment station built in the shape of a ship in New York City’s Union Square). The 30 Nov 1918 issue of American Rifleman notes that four women from the corps visited the Navy rifle range in Caldwell, NJ, and “made good at whatever they tried. And they tried practically everything in the way of marksmanship that we had to offer—from the short course to the machine gun” (197).

For a closer look at the camouflaging of the U.S.S. Recruit, visit the blog Camoupedia. One corps member who worked on the Recruit was artist Marguerite Carmel Becht (later Wilson), who went on to serve for nine months in YMCA canteens in Great Britain and France before her assignment to the YMCA facility at Walter Reed in 1919.

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